Welcome to The Management Consultants Network

Break into McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Oliver Wyman, Accenture, and other top management consulting firms with resources provided by top consultants and ex-consultants from around the world. The Management Consultants Network provides you everything you need to succeed in the consulting recruitment process - from start to finish. Best of all? It's completely free. Register for the site and check it out. 

Blog posts tagged in business world

While certain other sites (ahem) may charge you a couple of hundred dollars for this information, it's not rocket science. And to throw in an unrelated anecdote, a friend used the following quote in an I-Banking interview: "I'm an engineer. I can literally build rockets. Whatever you throw at me, I can handle" (Yes, he did make it to the final round).

Now back to e-mail addresses. Remember - before you e-mail an individual, or if you're looking for the right person to e-mail, Google "Firm Name + Your University + Recruiting".

A simple "Bain McGill Recruiting" search takes you right to Bain's McGill-specific page for recruitment, letting you know that Courtney Evans is the right person to e-mail. And what do you know, her e-mail is listed right there on the page. The second google link that comes up? BCG at McGill. Yes, folks, it's that easy. 

The following is the basic e-mail format for the major consulting firms:

McKinsey: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

...

Posted by Khaled Kteily on in Networking & Reputation

Full-time positions are tough to come by; internships are even more difficult by virtue of the number of positions available (generally a couple at each firm). Still - some students will be in the fortunate position of holding multiple internship offers. For those of you, congratulations! Here are a few critical points to keep in mind throughout the process:

1. Don't take forever to answer. 

This one is very important - the longer you take to answer a company, the less excited they think you are about joining. Don't keep a firm waiting for too long - a week or two is understandable, especially if they know you have other offers, but don't take longer than that, and give them a valid reason. At some point, you will have learned everything there is to know about the company - you don't need details about which cubicle you'll sit in, what type of laptop you'll get, and what the dress code is on Fridays. 

You've built good will by receiving an offer. Learn what you need to know and then make a decision. I've heard stories about students who received internship offers but took so long to reply that they lost all partner-level support - that hurt their reputation and prospects when they did accept the offer. Don't be that guy (or girl)!

...

I got forwarded this e-mail from a friend at another consulting firm - a student at NYU applying for an internship sent out an e-mail to JPMorgan and despite a very strong CV, has essentially destroyed his chances of ever working in banking or consulting. A few words of advice, as well as a link to an article with the full text below -

Students interested in consulting or banking: When you're a student going through recruitment, it's tempting to tell a firm that you have offers from dozens of firm across the board, all eagerly awaiting your response to the offer letters that they have practically thrown at you and are begging you to sign. I'd like to give you a quick and simple example of why this is a bad idea.